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The city of Albuquerque and Albuquerque Police Department on Friday released two cellphone videos, primary police report and list of all officers who responded to the scene at Los Altos Skate Park March 22, when 17-year-old Jaquise Lewis was shot and killed.

The videos are not likely to definitively settle the question of whether Lewis was armed and therefore shot in self-defense as claimed by APD.  That’s because the resolution is poor, the video is unsteady and the events unfolded from a distance after dark.

Judge Victor Lopez issued a writ of mandamus Thursday ordering APD to fully produce all items sought by Lewis’s mother, Munah Green, and her attorney in an April 10 Inspection of Public Records Act (IPRA) request.

Read: Memorandum of LawFinding of Fact and Conclusions of Law from Thursday’s court order

The initial public records request asked for nine groupings of public records relating to the shooting, including all police reports from Lewis’s March 22 shooting death, all 911 calls, “any and all unedited and unredacted videos” taken at the scene, including lapel camera footage, audio transcripts, a list of all APD officers at the scene, police radio broadcasts, and broader requests regarding the Los Altos Skate Park over the past five years.

Green and her attorney filed a civil lawsuit against the city and APD regarding the shooting, accusing APD of her son’s wrongful death and civil rights violations. The non-jury trial began Nov. 20.

The public records violations were a portion of the lawsuit, which claims APD used “selective screen shots” from cellphone video of the scene to make it appear as though Lewis had a gun in a May 8 news conference.

TIMELINE OF VIDEOS

The first video released contains the bulk of the incident from that night. It was shot by an unnamed person using a cell phone at the scene.

Editor’s note: The videos can be viewed in the video embedded below. If you’re on a mobile device, click here to view. Viewer discretion is advised. The videos are shown in full as they were released to KOB. The only edits made were a disclaimer and two small titles listing which video is being shown. 

It starts with a group of people fighting at the skate park. Jaquise Lewis can be clearly seen wearing a Los Angeles Lakers jersey and white glove on his right hand. (Image below.)

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57 seconds into the video, a man is seen pulling something from his back pocket while in a group of people. (Image below.)  

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Four seconds later, a person hidden in the crowd near that man is seen firing four shots into the air. (Image below.)

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About 1:15 into the video, Lewis can be seen in the background appearing to take or give something to another person who is dressed in black. Lewis lunges at a group of people, and two shots are fired. Lewis is seen lunging backward. It is unclear who fired the shots. (Image below.)  

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At 1:26 in the video, Lewis is seen approaching a group of people nearer to the person shooting the video. His white glove can be clearly seen on his right hand, but this is the moment APD presented as a still photo that they say showed Lewis had a gun in a May 8 news conference. It is unclear from the video – even when it is viewed frame-by-frame – if there is a gun in his hand. (Image below.)

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A woman is heard yelling what sounds like, “Don’t shoot! Get the f—- out of here,” though the first sentence is somewhat unclear. Just two seconds later, Lewis starts walking away from the group he had approached. (Image below.)  

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Three seconds after that, as Lewis is clearly walking away, a man in a black hoodie or shirt is seen shooting directly at Lewis as he walks, then runs away. Seven shots are fired within seconds. The muzzle blast can be seen in the photo. (Image below.)

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The person recording the video flees. At 1:43 in the video, as the person recording is running away, 10 more shots can be heard. At 2:07 in the video, three more shots are fired. People are heard crying for several seconds, then the video ends at 2:49.

26 total shots are fired in the duration of the video.

A second video shows the aftermath of the shooting. People can be seen tending to a person who was shot in the foreground of the video, while someone is heard calling police and telling them their friend was shot. It ends shortly thereafter.

VIDEO DOES NOT CLEAR ANYONE

APD initially said Lewis had a weapon of his own and has maintained in the many months since the shooting that Lewis was firing into the crowd and that he was shot in self-defense. He is seen clearly throwing punches in the videos. 

Green and other members of Lewis’s family have always denied that he was shooting into the crowd, and said the APD still image released June 22 only shows Lewis wearing the white glove.

The Office of the Medical Investigator’s autopsy report on Lewis’s death says he was shot twice in the incident – once in his torso and once in his arm. The wound to his torso “caused damage to the lungs, major blood vessels that carry blood to and from the heart, esophagus…and liver,” according to the OMI. It proved to be the fatal shot.

Lewis had no drugs in his system at the time of his death, but did have a .06 blood alcohol level, according to a toxicology report.

ABQ CITY ATTORNEY DISCUSSES VIDEO RELEASE

Albuquerque City Attorney Jessica Hernandez said APD wanted to keep the video withheld because they are still investigating the case and trying to identify other possible shooters. She gave KOB an interview Friday, three hours before the video was released.

“This is not a situation where the city has anything at all to hide. This is the law enforcement exception under the Public Records Act that says if it would compromise the investigation, withhold it,” Hernandez said. “So, this is not a situation where I said don’t produce it because I don’t like what it shows. This is not that at all.”

“We do believe that we were justified to not produce this because we genuinely believed at APD that it would compromise the investigation if it were produced,” she continued.

ASSED RESPONDS TO PUBLIC RECORDS PARTIAL RELEASE

Assed said he was pleased with Judge Lopez’s decision Thursday to grant the release of all the records he requested in his initial public records request.

“We are very pleased and not surprised by Judge Lopez’s decision in the IPRA complaint civil case. We embrace the decision and are pleased that the City of Albuquerque has as well without appeal,” he said in a statement to KOB.

Assed said he is now reviewing the items released Friday and would answer questions later.

“We believe this is step one to bringing closure to the family,” he said in the statement. “We will continue to work on behalf of the family of Jaquise Lewis and look forward to assisting them with the answers concerning the death of their 17 year old son.” 

OTHER RECORDS CONTAINED IN FRIDAY RELEASE

APD also released, in addition to the two videos, two other portions of the public records request Friday: the initial police report by APD and a log of every officer who showed up to the scene that night, for how long, and whether or not they turned in any lapel camera video from the incident.

The police report, of which a portion is attached, contains a short explanation of what happened that night, and focuses on several victims.

Editor’s note: Only a portion of the police report is attached because the rest of it lists victim’s names and addresses, which KOB will not release.

In addition to Lewis, at least one other man was shot. At least four other people suffered injuries that were documented in the initial police report, but none were explicitly listed as gunshot wounds.

The other person who was shot would not tell police who shot him, only saying he saw a fight in the parking lot and tried to intervene before he was shot in the chest.

The officer then talked to Lewis’s girlfriend, who was initially “very uncooperative,” according to the report. But she was eventually able to point the officer to Lewis, who was already dead at the time.

Several of the others who suffered injuries had already been transported before the officer who wrote the report was able to speak with them.

The personnel list of officers who showed up to the scene the night of March 22 and through the afternoon of March 23 lists 64 officers, though at least two of them are listed multiple times, and two units have no name associated with them.

Of the 64 units listed as having responded, 21 are listed as having uploaded lapel video.

Watch KOB’s 6:30 p.m. report in the video player embedded below. If you’re on a mobile device, click here. This story was originally published at KOB.com

The president of the Albuquerque Police Officers Association was released from jail on bond overnight after her arrest on child abuse charges Thursday.

Bernalillo County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Sgt. Aaron Williamson confirmed deputies started an investigation into APOA President Stephanie Lopez, 40, Wednesday and arrested her Thursday.

She faces child abuse without great bodily harm and bribery/intimidation/retaliation of a witness charges.

The criminal complaint for Lopez’s arrest says the alleged abuse happened Tuesday, when Lopez allegedly hit her 14-year-old daughter “repeatedly in the head and facial area.” APD was notified Wednesday.

The girl told school staff Tuesday her mother had hit her in the head and was taken to the school resource officer, who notified CYFD and APD. APD then referred the case to BCSO because of the conflict of interest.

A CYFD investigator briefly interviewed the girl, but the interview was stopped and the girl was taken to a safe house for a forensic interview.

The girl told investigators her mother, Lopez, got upset when the girl failed to tell her a utility shut off notice had been posted to their front door. Lopez allegedly hit her daughter “several times in the face causing significant bruising and pulled her hair before throwing her to the floor,” according to the criminal complaint.

When Lopez dropped her daughter off at school, the criminal complaint says she asked why her daughter “decided not to wear makeup today.” Lopez then allegedly told her daughter, “…think about what you say today at school; you won’t be with me; you won’t have your freedom. What happened to you was your fault.”

The criminal complaint says the daughter was scared to go home for fear of retaliation. It also says the daughter requested that nobody from Lopez’s side of the family be told about the situation “because they will lie for, and cover-up anything that Stephanie does.”

The girl said her younger brother and older sister witnessed the alleged abuse. The criminal complaint says the younger brother confirmed the girl’s account of the incident to the CYFD investigator.

Lopez told investigators should needed to speak to an attorney before speaking with detectives.

Albuquerque Police Department spokesman Tanner Tixier said that as of 8:45 p.m. Thursday, “no one” from APD had read the criminal complaint filed against her or had been briefed on the specifics of the case.

“Any further statements would not be appropriate until we have had the opportunity to thoroughly review the charges,” Tixier said.

Lopez is being held on a $5,000 cash-only bond at the Metropolitan Detention Center. She was booked just after 6:30 p.m. Thursday.

KOB has reached out to the APOA and city for comment, but has not received a reply yet.

This story was originally published at KOB.com

A Bernalillo County District Court judge on Thursday ordered the city of Albuquerque to release the videos the Albuquerque Police Department says shows Jaquise Lewis being shot and killed during an altercation at the Los Altos Skate Park.

The city of Albuquerque will also have to pay Lewis’s mother up to $100 for each day since April 10 until the day the videos are released as statutory damages.

Read: Memorandum of Law; Finding of Fact and Conclusions of Law

Judge Victor Lopez issued a writ of mandamus Thursday ordering APD to fully produce all items sought by Lewis’s mother, Munah Green, and her attorney in an April 10 Inspection of Public Records Act (IPRA) request.

The initial public records request asked for nine groupings of public records relating to the shooting, including all police reports from Lewis’s March 22 shooting death, all 911 calls, “any and all unedited and unredacted videos” taken at the scene, including lapel camera footage, audio transcripts, a list of all APD officers at the scene, police radio broadcasts, and broader requests regarding the Los Altos Skate Park over the past five years.

Green and her attorney filed a civil lawsuit against the city and APD regarding the shooting, accusing APD of her son’s wrongful death and civil rights violations. The non-jury trial began Nov. 20.

The public records violations were a portion of the lawsuit, which claims APD used “selective screen shots” from cellphone video of the scene to make it appear as though Lewis had a gun in a May 8 news conference.

Green and her attorney at the time were able to watch the full video in a private session June 22, which Judge Lopez says “complied with the spirit of IPRA,” but he wrote that when evidence and disclosures were released at trial, “the extent of that disclosure is uncertain and the disclosure was long overdue.”

“Defendant should complete its IPRA disclosure with regard to any documents that have not been disclosed to date,” Judge Lopez continued.

He also wrote that the City Attorney’s Office disclosed too much in the lead up to the trial, then later “sought to have returned to the City based on a claim of error in disclosing privileged or exempt investigatory records.”

He ruled that that “accidental” disclosure “essentially resulted in a waiver of the privilege or exemption under IPRA, and it discredits the City’s claim of privilege/exemption as criminal investigatory records.”

“Defendant [City of Albuquerque] shall release a copy of the video forthwith,” he wrote. “Nothing in IPRA indicates that a governmental body can deny a citizens request for information because some of this information may be exempt.”

The city had argued some of the material deserved a “‘law enforcement’ exemption,” which Judge Lopez also quashed.

Judge Lopez wrote that the city and APD “willfully ignored” the “lawful requests for public records” and says “[i]t took [Green] initiating a civil complaint to get this information, and [Green] is entitled to the remedies associated with enforcement of IPRA.”

Judge Lopez wrote he awarded the $100 per day damages “given the extent to which [the city] ignored [Green’s] otherwise lawful requests.

Green will also be reimbursed for court costs, attorney’s fees and recovery of costs. Her attorney, Ahmad Assed, will have to submit an affidavit totaling the amount of time he worked for her, including description of the services he provided, an explanation of the complexity of the case and an explanation of his standing in the legal community.

Police say Lewis was killed in self-defense, but some witnesses have said the opposite. No arrests have been made in the case so far.

KOB asked the city and APD if they could give a specific date as to when the video would be released, as was ordered under IPRA law by Judge Lopez.

Albuquerque City Attorney Jessica Hernandez released the following statement to KOB Thursday evening after the court ruling came down:

“This shooting was a tragedy that left one person dead and six others injured. There is at least one additional shooter that investigators are working to identify. Premature release of information will compromise those efforts and make it more difficult to solve this case.”

This story was originally published at KOB.com

©Blair Rich Miller 2007-2015. All rights reserved.